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Q & A

Here we answer some of the question people ask us. Please don´t hesitate to send us an email if you have additional questions.

Q: What does Giving a Future do?

A: We are a non-government organization working towards giving stray animals worthy living conditions in Myanmar/Burma. We always strive to give aid the the animals that needs our help the most. We work on site where the animals live with neuture/spay (ABC) programs and vaccinating against rabies. We also give aid to animals suffering from the skin disease Mange and cat-flu. In the future we hope to be able to run a small mobile emergency clinic, and shelter for paralized and injured animals. We also want to bring attention to other important issues which highly impacts animal safety in Myanmar, such as puppy mills, illegal export of dogs to the meat-trade in China, and the mass killing of dogs in Yangon with poisoned meat (currently taking the lives of 3-4000 dogs per month)

Read more about this under “goals” and “projects”.

Q: Why does GAF not run a shelter?

A: Many have the assuption that the only or best way to work with animal welfare locally and over time is to run a shelter. GAFs experience is that this provides a “golden ticket” for the few selected animals who will be fostered in the shelter, while leaving the large masses out. While we fully support the engagement of our friends in other organizations and shelters we also want to reach out to larger amounts of animals. The way we do this is by working in the dog or cat´s natural environment. Please read more about how we do this HERE.

These animals are often seen as pets in Western parts of the world, but keeping a pet is still a rare thing in most Asian cultures, even in societies most affectionate with animals. Thus the general view of looking after the animals is different. In Myanmar many have dogs living on their doorstep or street, giving him/her a name, feeding it and playing with it, but most will not take responsibility for sterilizing or helping a wounded animal as they have no direct ownership to it. Poverty is also a problem whereas such expenses are high for most people. Labor animals such as cows and donkeys are kept until they are either too weak, or too old, to work.

This mindset is at large much more common in developing countries where poverty strikes larger areas, and everyday struggle to survive. This makes it less important to take care of an animal unless you can use it for transport or food. In situations like this animal welfare is a luxury that most people simply can’t afford

Q: Does any of the money donated go to administrative work in Giving a Future?

A: No. All of the work we do is 100% on a voluntary basis. There are some small expenses such as providing the web hosting, but these costs we cover ourselves. All donated money goes directly to the animals we work with.

Q: How can I, as a donor, be guaranteed that the money is actually spent on helping the animals?

A: Our aim as an organization is to be as transparent as possible. As a small 100% voluntary organization we have no administrative costs or salaries to give an account for, nor other hidden expenses. If we travel to visit a shelter we only use our own money. We do not have any intermediary link which could misdirect transactions, instead we communicate directly with the recipients of our aid directly.

Q: How can “Giving a Future” know that the money is spent correctly?

A: As part of our practice we require our recipients to report back to us on how the financial support was spent. The fields we work in are mainly hands-on projects such as performing surgery on a dog, or castrating a cat which easily can be given account for. (Veterinary salary, surgical tools, medicines etc.) We also focus on building trusting relationships before starting any collaboration, as well as visiting the community in person if possible.

Q: What animals do you help?

A: We mainly work with stray dogs as the estimated 3 millions makes out the larger number of stray animals in Myanmar. Many suffer from hard living conditions, starvation, diseases and human threats; puppy-mills, illegal sale to the meat-trade in China and inhumane killing ethics. We also give aid to cats. These animals are often seen as pets in Western parts of the world, but keeping a pet is still a rare thing in most Asian cultures, even in societies most affectionate with animals. Thus the general view of looking after the animals is different, and no one in particular will take responsibility for sterilizing or helping a wounded animal as they have no ownership to it. Labour animals such as cows and donkeys are kept until they are either too weak, or too old, to work.
This mindset is at large much more common in developing countries where poverty strikes larger areas, and everyday struggle to survive. This makes it less important to take care of an animal unless you can use it for transport or food. In situations like this animal welfare is a luxury that most people simply can’t afford

Q: Why are you focused on Asia/ Myanmar?

A: Our main focus on Asia and Myanmar comes from hands on experiences with the often overwhelming situation for strays in many South Asian countries. Through research in India, Myanmar (Burma), Laos and Malaysia, we realized how often there is minimal, or no help for wounded or starving strays in this region. We have also seen how hopeless the situation is for many shelters when they face more sick and needing animals every day in their local society than they are able to help.

When we first got engaged in Myanmar there were only 3 shelters in the whole country (1 in Yangon, 1 outside Mandalay and Pwin Oo Lwin). No other help or animal groups excited. Thus we decided to fully focus on this country.

 

contact@givingafuture.org

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